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The neolithic period

The neolithic period

The neolithic period

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The Neolithic Period established itself very gradually in the Middle East between 12,500 BC and 7,000 BC approximately. It was from here that the ideas and elements of Neolithic society spread to Europe, in particular the plants and domestic animals for which there was no local, wild stock. Coming from the south east of Europe, the new civilisation reached the South of France around 6,500 BC via the Mediterranean, and reached Alsace via the Danube and its tributaries around 6,000 BC.


The Neolithic Period marked a deep change in the way societies were organised. Man invented a new way of life. As a settled farmer, he established villages and cemeteries, cultivated cereals and legumes, raised oxen, cows, pigs, sheep and goats.


As a corollary to this new production economy, several technical inventions appeared. Polishing certain stone tools, axes and adzes necessary for working in wood, inspired the name itself of the new civilisation (Neolithic, the New Stone Age, from the Greek neos, meaning new, and lithos, meaning stone).

6th to 3rd Millennium BC

Ceramics, weaving, basketwork and woodwork renewed and diversified man’s material resources.
The Neolithic Period brought a huge demographic expansion, producing a cultural diversity that responded to increasingly densely populated territories. It remains today, the foundation of our way of life.

6th to 3rd Millennium BC